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Category Life

Using the Spanish 'A' for Reasons Other Than Indicating Motion
Life

Using the Spanish 'A' for Reasons Other Than Indicating Motion

Although the Spanish preposition a is usually used to indicate motion toward and thus often translated as "to," it also is frequently used to form phrases that can explain how something is done or to describe nouns as well as in time expressions. Using A to Mean 'In the Style Of' One common use of a is similar to its use in a few English phrases, such as "a la carte" and "a la mode" that come to us via French.

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Life

Akkadian Empire: The World's First Empire

As far as we know, the world's first empire was formed in 2350 B.C.E. by Sargon the Great in Mesopotamia. Sargon's empire was called the Akkadian Empire, and it prospered during the historical age known as the Bronze Age. Anthropologist Carla Sinopoli, who provides a useful definition of empire, lists the Akkadian Empire as among those lasting two centuries.
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Life

The Ptolemies: Dynastic Egypt From Alexander to Cleopatra

The Ptolemies were the rulers of the final dynasty of 3,000 years of ancient Egypt, and their progenitor was a Macedonian Greek by birth. The Ptolemies broke millennia of tradition when they based the capital of their Egyptian empire not in Thebes or Luxor but in Alexandria, a newly constructed port on the Mediterranean Sea.
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Life

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology Admissions

Those interested in applying to Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology will need to submit an application, high school transcripts, scores from the SAT or ACT, and letters of recommendation. For complete application instructions and guidelines, be sure to visit the school's website. With an acceptance rate of 61 percent, the majority of applicants are admitted each year, making the school generally accessible.
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Life

Biography of Sun Yat-sen, Chinese Revolutionary Leader

Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866-March 12, 1925) holds a unique position in the Chinese-speaking world today. He is the only figure from the early revolutionary period who is honored as the "Father of the Nation" by people in both the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China (Taiwan). Fast Facts: Sun Yat-sen Known For : Chinese Revolutionary figure, "Father of the Nation" Born : November 12, 1866 in Cuiheng village, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China Parents : Sun Dacheng and Madame Yang Died : March 12, 1925 in Peking (Beijing), China Education : Cuiheng elementary school, Iolani high school, Oahu College (Hawaii), Government Central School (Queen's College), Hong Kong College of Medicine Spouse(s) : Lu Muzhen (m.
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Life

Winthrop University Admissions

Winthrop University Description: Winthrop University is a public university located in Rock Hill, South Carolina, about 20 minutes from Charlotte. Founded in 1886, the university has many buildings on the National Historic Register. The diverse student body comes from 42 states and 54 countries. Undergraduates can choose from 41 degree programs with business administration and art being the most popular.
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Life

Who Are the Manchu?

The Manchu are a Tungistic people - meaning "from Tunguska" - of Northeastern China. Originally called "Jurchens," they are the ethnic minority for whom the region of Manchuria is named. Today, they are the fifth-largest ethnic group in China, following the Han Chinese, Zhuang, Uighurs, and Hui. Their earliest known control of China came in the form of the Jin Dynasty of 1115 to 1234, but their prevalence by name "Manchu" didn't come until later in the 17th century.
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Life

Health Effects of Airport Noise and Pollution

Researchers have known for years that exposure to excessively loud noise can cause changes in blood pressure as well as changes in sleep and digestive patterns, all signs of stress on the human body. The very word “noise” itself derives from the Latin word “noxia,” which means injury or hurt. Airport Noise and Pollution Increase Risk for Illness On a 1997 questionnaire distributed to two groups (one living near a major airport, and the other in a quiet neighborhood), two-thirds of those living near the airport indicated they were bothered by aircraft noise, and most said that it interfered with their daily activities.
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Life

Movies Based on Books by Dean Koontz

Dean Koontz is one of the most prolific suspense writers alive. It is no surprise, then, that many of Koontz's books have been adapted into movies. Here is a complete list of Dean Koontz movies by year. Dean Koontz Film Adaptations 1977 - "The Passengers" aka "The Intruder" (1979 video release) This was adapted from the novel "Shattered," which Koontz wrote under the name of K.
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Life

National Negro Business League: Fighting Jim Crow with Economic Development

Overview During the Progressive Era African-Americans were faced with severe forms of racism. Segregation in public places, lynching, being barred from the political process, limited healthcare, education and housing options left African-Americans disenfranchised from American Society. African-American reformists developed various tactics to help fight against racism and discrimination that was present in United States' society.
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Life

The Arian Controversy and the Council of Nicea

The Arian controversy (not to be confused with the Indo-Europeans known as Aryans) was a discourse that occurred in the Christian church of the 4th century CE, that threatened to upend the meaning of the church itself. The Christian church, like the Judaic church before it, was committed to monotheism: all the Abrahamic religions say there is only one God.
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Life

The Second Great Awakening

The Second Great Awakening (1790-1840) was a time of evangelical fervor and revival in the newly formed nation of America. The British colonies were settled by many individuals who were looking for a place to worship their Christian religion free from persecution. As such, America arose as a religious nation as observed by Alexis de Tocqueville and others.
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Life

The Persian Achaemenid Dynasty

The Achaemenids were the ruling dynasty of Cyrus the Great and his family over the Persian empire, (550-330 BC). The first of the Persian Empire Achaemenids was Cyrus the Great (aka Cyrus II), who wrested control of the area from its Median ruler, Astyages. Its last ruler was Darius III, who lost the empire to Alexander the Great.
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Life

Penn State Brandywine Admissions

Penn State Brandywine Admissions Overview: In 2016, Penn State Brandywine had an acceptance rate of 83%, which makes the school generally accessible to those who apply. Along with a completed application and high school transcripts, prospective students will need to submit scores from the ACT or SAT.
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Life

Simple vs. Progressive Tenses

Here is a comparison between simple and simple progressive tenses. As a rule of thumb please remember that any form of the progressive can only be used with an action verb. Nonprogressive verbs include: Mental States know believe imagine want realize feel doubt need understand suppose remember prefer recognize think forget mean Emotional State love hate fear mind like dislike envy care appreciate Possession possess have own belong Sense Perceptions taste hear see smell feel Other Existing States seem cost be consist of look owe exist contain appear weigh include The following exceptions apply to the above: (As an activity) think -- I am thinking about this grammar have -- She is having a good time.
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Life

Garage Mate For Your EV: How About A Minivan?

What is the ideal garage companion for your electric vehicle? If you're an active family where one, or both, parents regularly have to drive cars in different directions and you need something big enough for the weekly soccer practice or school runs, a seven- or eight-seat minivan should be a strong consideration.
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Life

Salisbury University Admissions

Salisbury University Admissions Overview: Salisbury University has an acceptance rate of 61%, making it a somewhat selective school. Successful applicants will generally need good grades and a solid application to be admitted. Students will need to submit an application, high school transcripts, letters of recommendation, and a personal essay.
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Life

Hopewell Culture - North America's Mound Building Horticulturalists

The Hopewell culture (or Hopewellian culture) of the United States refers to a prehistoric society of Middle Woodland (100 BC-AD 500) horticulturalists and hunter-gatherers. They were responsible for building some of the largest indigenous earthworks in the country, and for obtaining imported, long distance source materials from Yellowstone Park to the Gulf coast of Florida.
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Life

What's Wrong with Chicken?

According to the US Department of Agriculture, the consumption of chicken in the United States has been climbing steadily since the 1940s, and is now close to that of beef. Just from 1970 to 2004, chicken consumption more than doubled, from 27.4 pounds per person per year, to 59.2 pounds. But some people are swearing off chicken because of concerns about animal rights, factory farming, sustainability and human health.
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Life

Possessive Pronouns

Possessive pronouns are used to show ownership of an item or an idea. Possessive pronouns are very similar to possessive adjectives and it's easy to confuse the two. Here are some examples of possessive pronouns immediately followed by possessive adjectives that are different in structure, but similar in meaning.
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Life

How Does the Kastle-Meyer Test Detect Blood?

The Kastle-Meyer test is an inexpensive, easy, and reliable forensic method to detect the presence of blood. Here is how to perform the test. Materials Kastle-Meyer solution 70 percent ethanol distilled or deionized water 3 percent hydrogen peroxide cotton swabs dropper or pipette a sample of dried blood Perform the Kastle-Meyer Blood Test Steps Moisten a swab with water and touch it to a dried blood sample.
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